Poetics of the Real, Politics of the Self

Sunday  13 August  2017  12:00 PM    Sunday  13 August  2017 10:00 PM
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Nomadic academy of experimental arts presents:

Poetics of the Real, Politics of the Self
Peter Weiss and experimental cinema, 1949 – 2016

in Harakka island auditorium. The event is the third "from noon to midnight" event. Free entry.

The ferryboat once in a 1/2 hour from the pier in the front of Cafe Ursula in Kaivopuisto Park – the return ticket costs 5 euros. Be sure to have cash with you for the ferryboat! We will leave the island at 22:00 and continue the last discussions in the city.

We recommend also this screening a day before,
at 12.8., 14:00-16:00

Lydia Moyer (US):
The Forcing no. 2 (7 min)
Paradise (57 min)
Film screening and interview with the artist.
Harakka Artist House, 2nd floor Auditorium (same place!)

Welcome!

....

Peter Weiss (1916 – 1982) is best known for his writings and theatre plays, with his novel The Aesthetics of Resistance being one of the major works of German literature of the 20th century. Weiss, however, started his artistic career as a painter, and in the 1950s he was primarily a filmmaker. His filmic oeuvre comprises experimental and documentary shorts as well as two feature length films. Marked by personal economical crisis and an exhausting search for artistic expression and recognition, this period in the life of Peter Weiss characterizes the transition from a introspective view inspired by surrealism to the engagement with social and political reality.

Weiss' interest in film began with writing reviews for Swedish newspapers. His theoretical reflections resulted in the 1956 book Avantgardefilm, which is among the first books of its kind: Through the analysis of a subjective choice of experimental films—from the 1920s to the post-war avant-garde—Weiss elaborates on the poetic power of the medium and its capacity to discover new audiovisual worlds.

Poetics of the Real, Politics of the Self takes Weiss' work with film as a direct and discursive vantage point. By thematizing inner conflict, alienation and family relations, time, space and social discipline, body and identity as well as modern urban living and resistance, the selection of Swedish and international short films from 1949 to 2016 discusses the relationship between aesthetic and political subjectivity.

Each of the three programs is followed by a conversation with the audience.

Curated by Florian Wüst.
Moderated by Sezgin Boynik.
16mm projector operated by Petteri Kalliomäki
Organized by Kari Yli-Annala/Nomadic academy of experimental arts.

THE PROGRAM

12:00
(There is a break in boat traffic between 12:00 and 13:00
so we recommend you to arrive 12:00 boat)
Welcome

12:30
Studie II (Hallucinationer), Peter Weiss, SE 1952, 6'
The Lead Shoes, Sidney Peterson, US 1949, 17'
Studie IV (Frigörelse), Peter Weiss, SE 1954, 9'
Red Shift, Gunvor Nelson, SE 1984, 50'

Break with food

15:30
(If you come to see only this part, we recommend you to take 15:00 ferryboat)
Heidi Tikka will be present in the beginning of this section!

Enligt lag, Peter Weiss, Hans Nordenström, SE 1957, 18'
Metro Means of Conveyance, Olle Hedman, SE 1977, 7'
Es gibt Bilder, weil es Wände gibt – Ein Prolog, Sasha Pirker, AT 2013, 11'
On the Threshold of Liberty, Heidi Tikka, FI 1992, 11'
Schicht, Alex Gerbaulet, DE 2015, 28'

Break with coffee + wine

18:30
(If you come to see only this part, we recommend you to take 18:00 ferryboat)
Bag de ens facader, Peter Weiss, DK 1961, 27'
Aliena Kadabra, Åke Karlung, SE 1969, 6'
Ici rien, Daphne Hérétakis, FR/GR 2011, 30'
The Ceremony, Lina Selander, Oscar Mangione, SE 2016, 16'

With special thanks to:
Filmform, Stockholm
Arsenal – Institute for Film and Video Art, Berlin
sixpackfilm, Vienna
Alex Gerbaulet
Daphne Hérétakis
Lina Selander
and Mika Taanila

The event is realised with the help of a grant from Finnish Cultural Foundation, Uusimaa Regional Fund.

FILM DESCRIPTIONS

1)

Studie II (Hallucinationer), Peter Weiss, SE 1952, 6'
Studie II (Hallucinationer) comprises twelve staged scenes that were modelled after a set of drawings. Accompanied by metallic sounds, human bodies, limbs and objects form surrealistic collages against the background of a black space. Peter Weiss intended to show pure inner feelings; images that can't be deciphered completely. In a conversation with Harun Farocki from 1980, however, Weiss admitted that the film had a strong psychological effect, which—in reference to his exile from Germany—had to do with "the traumatic as well as dreamlike experience of rupture and alienation".

The Lead Shoes, Sidney Peterson, US 1949, 17'
Like many other experimental filmmakers, Sidney Peterson sought to reevaluate our perception of the world. In The Lead Shoes our eyes are fooled by the help of a distorting anamorphic lens through which the story of a mother and her diver-suited son is told. The soundtrack is composed of people singing, playing jazz songs or simply talking. What they say has nothing to do with what happens in the film, thus pushing our disorientation even further. Peterson's film, made at Workshop 20 at San Francisco Art Institute, forces us to take both time and space as relative experiences.

Studie IV (Frigörelse), Peter Weiss, SE 1954, 9'
In Studie IV (Frigörelse) Peter Weiss combines abstraction and real imagery. A young man (Carlo Derkert) moves slowly through different spaces, partly draging his alter ego on his back. He enters a bourgeois room and searches a box full of white papers; next to him sits an old couple—mother and father—silently at the table. Such scenes are intercut with close ups of tools and hands reaching through piles of strings and wires. The film symbolizes the liberation from the parents and the attempt to throw off an old dentity—a subject Weiss further explored in his autobiographical 1961 novel Farewell to the Parents.

Red Shift, Gunvor Nelson, SE 1984, 50'
Red Shift is one of Gunvor Nelson’s most admired works, a dense narrative film about family relations. Nelson addresses her own place in time between her young daughter and her aging mother while the letters of American frontierswoman Calamity Jane to her estranged daugther are read in the voice over as a reminder of the heartbreak and sacrifice of motherhood. Pending between extreme close-ups and long shots, "Nelson’s depiction of family life is both candid and considerate, displaying an amalgamation of emotions ranging from delight to distress." (John Sundholm)

2)

Enligt lag, Peter Weiss, Hans Nordenström, SE 1957, 18'
Enligt lag (According to Law) portrays the subjugated life of inmates in a youth prison in Uppsala: garden work, meals, a visit from a charitable organization, self-tattooing, guards mechanically locking and unlocking doors. "We actually experienced a quite ordinary daily routine, just in a milieu we don't know. A milieu completely shut off from so-called normality. But it is normality for those who sit there over years. That's what we portrayed. The other thing we portrayed—of course, this was cut out by the censors—is sexual need." (Peter Weiss)

Metro Means of Conveyance, Olle Hedman, SE 1977, 7'
In Metro Means of Conveyance Olle Hedman refines a film poetics based on audiovisual abstraction from real objects and events. While the soundtrack was recorded in the Châtelet Metro station in Paris, the images show completely different things and movements, foremost a pendulum shot from various angles. The stark black and white contrast makes the film an experience of light and darkness set to the machinic rhythm of the pendulum. Towards the end, a close-up of an eye is intercut, suggesting a meta-perspective on what is seen, but what remains elusive.

Es gibt Bilder, weil es Wände gibt – Ein Prolog, Sasha Pirker, AT 2013, 11'
In Sasha Pirker's film Es gibt Bilder, weil es Wände gibt – Ein Prolog (There are Pictures because there are Walls – A Prologue) sculptor Christian Ruschitzka and his assistants carefully carry away the parts of a trailer home and compact them into objects. This literal dismantling of the trailer, its sculptural transformation and the spoken texts invite reflections on housing and homelessness, use and usefulness. Space is dissected cinematically, linguistically, and at the hands of the artist. Pirker's approach to space corresponds entirely with French novelist George Perec, from whom the text passages originate.

On the Threshold of Liberty, Heidi Tikka, FI 1992, 11'
Heidi Tikka's poetic short film, made during an artist residency in New York, deconstructs the relationship between self, language and image. Close-up shots of distinctive activities are accompanied by an intimate voice over: "Maybe the moment of the split will reproduce itself endlessly. Maybe the moment of the split never existed. Maybe the moment of the split will dissolve into light." Tikka questions the Freudian notion of the body/mind split by replacing it with her vision of an endlessly layered, multiple and rhythmic process.

Schicht, Alex Gerbaulet, DE 2015, 28'
Schicht (Shift) is both a reckoning and a search for traces of the past. Alex Gerbaulet embarks on a trip through the industrial city of Salzgitter, West Germany: mining, steel factory, model city. Pulsating, sometimes breathless, the film unfolds the portrait of the filmmaker's family, brought to life by records from private archives. Her father Rudolf completes his apprenticeship at the Reichswerke Hermann Göring, works in the mine and at the Volkswagen plant. Her mother Doris suffers from multiple sclerosis. They name their younger daughter after a singer: Alexandra. As a rebellious punk, however, she takes a different path.

3)

Bag de ens facader, Peter Weiss, DK 1961, 27'
The rapid population growth in Copenhagen in the mid-20th century required new living space further from the city centre. The old town quarters of the Danish capital offered neither enough space nor did they provide a life close to nature for families with children. Taking the examples of Carlsrø in Rodøvre and Milestedet in Brøndbyøster, Peter Weiss' last film Bag de ens facader (Behind the same facades), produced in collaboration with radio journalist Eva-Ree Hinrichsen, investigates modern suburbian housing in a surprisingly open-minded fashion.

Aliena Kadabra, Åke Karlung, SE 1969, 6'
Produced as part of an eponymous exhibition, Aliena Kadabra is made in a mixed technique of animation, paint and found footage, typical for Åke Karlung's way of working. In a dizzying montage of images and sound, Karlung aims his blows at Western civilization and welfare society. The 1983 Moderna Museet catalogue, Nordic Film, describes Aliena Kadabra in cryptic terms: "About unfree TechnoPornoSwine in their ancient opposite—the fluctuation between a Narcopathic Sensualism and frustrated Disciplinism."

Ici rien, Daphne Hérétakis, FR/GR 2011, 30'
Daphne Hérétakis started the shooting of Ici rien in September 2008, mainly in Athens' Exarhia district, a centre of social protest and resistance in the heart of the city. As the months passed, going back and forth between Paris and Athens until April 2011, and with the financial, economical and political crisis in Greece evolving, the film became a canvas on which fragments of stories and testimonies finally found a place, composing the tattered landscape of a country in turmoil.

The Ceremony, Lina Selander, Oscar Mangione, SE 2016, 16'
The Ceremony presents an odyssey of archival and self-recorded material that spans over time and space. Circling around the 1960s housing blocks in Stockholm's suburb Bredäng, other cities appear abandoned or under construction, places, histories and identities intertwine. An image from Olof Rudbeck’s Atlantica (1677) in which the author tears a piece off the Earth’s crust, revealing Sweden as the sunken Atlantis, and in the same audaciously unscientific way freed from reality’s hold, serves as the starting point for the film, using the myth of Atlantis to unveil a political utopia that has been lost in time.

With special thanks to Filmform, Stockholm, Arsenal – Institute for Film and Video Art, Berlin, sixpackfilm, Vienna, Alex Gerbaulet, Daphne Hérétakis, Lina Selander and Mika Taanila. The event is realised with the help of a grant from Finnish Cultural Foundation, Uusimaa Regional Fund.

More information: Kari Yli-Annala/+358504318898
http://nomadinenakatemia.blogspot.fi

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Come also to this event at 12.8!

14:00-16:00

Lydia Moyer (US):

The Forcing no. 2 (7 min)
Paradise (57 min)

Film screening and interview with the artist.
Harakka Artist House, 2nd floor Auditorium

Harakka Island, Helsinki
Free entry.

The boat to Harakka island leaves from Kaivopuisto at Cafe Ursula pier every 30 minutes. Please raise up the white sign in order to call the boat. Return journey 5 €.

The Forcing no. 2 (7 min)
Begun in the wake of recent (and ongoing) unrest in Ferguson, MO, The Forcing (no. 2) is a a meditation on power and the longing for deliverance in contemporary America.
It combines original sound and video with appropriated content, observing no hierarchy of image quality or authorship.

Paradise (57 min)
Made over the course of eight years, Paradise is an essay film that examines loss as it is written – or in many cases unwritten – on the land. Weaving between the poetic, the speculative and the personal, its ultimate focus is ownership and community in America and the tolls those ideas have taken on the places we have made, imagined, and let go.

Lydia Moyer is a visual artist and media maker who lives and works in central Virginia, USA. Her work approaches documentary and journalistic concerns through the lens of art, collecting and manipulating archival, appropriated and original material to investigate the expressive potential of non-fiction. Working between moving images, photographs, and writing over the past ten years, she has produced a feature length video poem,
over a dozen shorts videos, and numerous artist’s books, some of which are collaborations with other writers. She is on the faculty of the art department at the University of Virginia.

Event organized by Harakka ry.

More information: emmi.jormalainen@gmail.com +358 400 694 554
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/1380077198767058/fref=ts

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